Earth’s do-over.

This post is a thought bubble. The idea is not yet fully formed. It may never be. It is unlikely that my train of thought is unique or original.

How far back in mankind’s* history would you have to go to do a successful do-over that would right the wrongs of today? Not just “fix” these problems, but make sure they never actually happen. What alternate decisions should we have made? 

What sliding doors did we need to close to prevent the damage we are doing to the earth?

What other path should we have chosen to prevent all the -isms which lead to wars, violence and death. 

What survey questions should we have answered to prevent marginalisation, discrimination and poverty based on how you looked, and who you love? 

Which box should we have picked to prevent the divide between super-rich and everyone else?

Which ancient parents should have practiced better birth control? And then, what behaviours should they have ignored so they were not encouraged?  

What inventions should never have been developed? 

What eureka moments should have been left in the bath?

Religion – more harm than good?

My big three do-over steps

A few ideas come to mind.

  • Money?
  • Religion?
  • Humans themselves?

As I said my idea is a thought bubble but on very shallow inspection it would seem that perhaps humans should not have been invented. Every problem stems from there. I don’t see any other living things causing as many problems as we do. What about art and music and poetry and all those beautiful things we create? Not much good if we can’t breath the air or can’t stand the heat or are worried about land mines.

I’m going to leave this parked here and do some reading and find out what other people think. 

*The fact I had to use that word as opposed to a non-gendered term in itself is something to do-over. 

and don’t worry mum! I’m fine – just thinking out loud 🙂

Freedom day In Greater Sydney

Freedom Day? October 11th 2021.

Today has been unofficially labelled as “Freedom Day” for people in NSW and especially those of us in Greater Sydney. We have been in lockdown since June 16. We started with Lockdown Lite followed by full-strength lockdown since 28th June. Today, the Monday after the State reached 70% fully vaxxed, we are getting out! But not completely. 

The shops will be open, not just the essential ones. Cafes and restaurants will be open under various density rules that limit the number of people who may enter. We can have up to ten people  visit our homes. We can ditch the masks when we are outside but still need them indoors. The “roadmap” is long and precise. 

Everything you need to know!

Tourist in your own town.

We can travel beyond our LGA but we can not leave Greater Sydney and conversely, regional people can not travel to Greater Sydney. We have to wait till 80% vaxxed for that. There’s no firm date for the 80% day, but it will be some time in early November. By December 1 2021, everyone including those confined to the “leper colonies” of the unvaxxed, will be allowed to do basically anything with no density or occupancy limits. I guess this means for the next little while we will all be tourists in our own town or city.

Finding little delights while out COVID-walking

Nervous Nellys?

I have to admit I am a little anxious about going back out into the big wide world, and I know that there are plenty of other nervous Nellys like me. Will people go crazy and forget to keep their distance? Will there be a spike in numbers? (The answer to that is yes, of course there will be!) Will the lockdown we have just endured be for nought? I hope not. 

It doesn’t help that our Premier, Gladys quit last week and the new fellow seems like a backward sort of person who supported Trump! He made some significant changes to the roadmap including bringing schools back a week early while still demanding all teachers are vaxxed before they can return. Many teachers have bookings but can’t get the jab in time, but they won’t be allowed to come to school. Just who will take their classes?

Keeping a low profile

I have decided I’m going to continue to keep a low profile until we reach the 80% target. I am fully vaxxed, but that does not mean I am not capable of being a transmitter. Some of my work colleagues are very vulnerable and I don’t want to put them at risk.

Besides that, I quite liked some of the aspects of lockdown. Not ”having” to go out. Saving truckloads of money. Enjoying walks after dinner. Picnics. Outdoor crafternoons with a singles buddy. I am hoping these habits stay after today. The thought of going back to a noisy pub or restaurant as the preferred entertainment option does not fill me with joy. At least lockdown gave me a good excuse to pamper my introverted side.

More COVID-walking!

I am rather glad that the craft stores will be open though! 🙂 

Snapshots of Wollongong – Ken Ausburn Track

This post returns to the Snapshots of Wollongong Series. I haven’t done one for quite awhile! With lockdown still keeping us close to home in the Greater Sydney region, I went looking for some novel walks. I came across a short track that links to the Mt Keira Ring Track which I have featured in a previous Snapshot post.

The Ken Ausburn Track starts at the northern end of Northfeilds Ave, just near the big roundabout and the University of Wollongong. The track, although managed by the NSW National Parks and Wildlife, is on land owned by the University and BHP. It is named after Kenneth Ausburn, who was the first Head of Physics at the Uni and a keen bushwalker.

Just a short stroll

The Ken Ausburn Track is very short, only about 1 .5 km but it is fairly steep. There are several flights of wooden steps and boardwalks and other areas with steps made with treated logs. At the end of the trail you can turn right towards Mt Pleasant (a further ~0.5 km) or left to get to the Ring Track. This short section of about 600 m is well used by mountain bike riders so make sure you listen out for them. The track is narrow and it would be a close squeeze if walkers and riders ended up in the same section. The track is mostly bare compacted dirt. It would be a terror in the wet, so I’d recommend avoiding it on a rainy day.

Deer Deer!

You’ll see plenty of deer poop on the grassy lower sections of the track. Feral deer are a big problem in the Illawarra and their numbers are increasing. I have written a post about this which you can find in my archives.

Feral deer are a significant issue in the Illawarra

Accessible by Public Transport

The University is on the free city bus route. You could get off at the main Uni bus area (see map below), walk up Northfields Ave for about 400 m and join the track. The trail head is easy to find although it looks a bit like someone’s back yard. You could use this track to access the Ring Track which is NOT serviced by public transport. If you did the Ken Ausburn Track plus the complete loop of the Ring Track it would be pleasant walk coming in at under 10 km. If you wanted a longer walk you could add in the Robertson Lookout (another 2.5km).

Architectural treats

In addition to the pleasant walk, there are two architectural treats along the way. Firstly, the Lawrence Hargrave Memorial and then the Kermira Brick Ventilation Shaft. The memorial is a modern stainless steel sculpture depicting a flying creature. It was crafted by Bert Flugelman in 1988. There is apparently a small replica in the grounds of the Uni itself. A friend told me that she watched the sculpture being airlifted in by an army helicopter when she was still in primary school. On the other hand, the ventilation shaft is constructed from red bricks and is rather elegant. It was erected in the 1890s. There are several interpretive signs on the route which point out plant species and the history of the track. It was originally a rail line for getting coal down the hill and then on to the harbour.

Best views

The best views are from the start of the track, specifically on the first flight of wooden stairs. You need to walk up a very steep grassed section first. From here you can see the city laid out in front of you and to the south, the Nan Tien Temple. As you get up higher there are too many trees blocking the view. (Darn nature!!) There is a section marked as a lookout a bit further up but it is very overgrown and you can’t see much.

Logisitcs.

As I said, you could catch the bus to the Uni. If you do drive be aware that the parking is limited and most is only for two hours (even on weekends). The section near the Uni colleges is not time limited but I think it would be hard to come by a spare space in peak periods and during Uni session times. There are publicly accessible toilets at the Uni. If you choose to add on the Ring Track, there is a toilet at Byarong Park. There is a coffee shop at the Mt Keira Summit but check the opening hours as it is not very reliable, especially in COVID times. Byarong Park has several picnic tables and is a great place to stop. Take full advantage of being outdoors and carry a packed lunch.

Of course, take enough water. Don’t be lulled into thinking it’s only a short walk and you won’t need water. It is very steep in sections and will get you puffing. If you add on the Ring Track there is no where to fill up your water bottle.

Google it!