Geology Part 2 – Stories from the Great Southern Road Trip

Road sign saying Geology Point

Geology Nerd – Part 2 – Tasmania

This post is the second of a two part series about some of the geology and geological formations I encountered on my recent road trip across the south-east of Australia. Part 1 included those features seen in NSW. After scooting through Victoria as quick as I could because of concerns related to a five day COVID lock down I boarded the Spirit of Tasmania with my trusty Suby and all my camping gear.

Once off the ferry, it didn’t take long before I started to see some interesting things rock-wise. The descriptions are listed in the order I visited them.

Do rivers count as geology?

The first thing to catch my eye while driving from Devonport to Launceston was the Rubicon River. I’m not really sure if riverine vegetation counts as geology but what the heck! The islands of grass made sinuous patterns in the slow-flowing water. After a little investigation, it seems that these clumps of grass are in fact an invasive species called rice grass. There is a federally funded program to help eradicate it.

Geology - Islands of grass in the Rubicon River Tasmania
Rubicon River – Islands of Grass.

Bakers Beach – Narawantapu National Park

My first glimpse of Tasmania’s famous orange boulders was on a grey day. A fine mist of drizzle was fogging up my lens. The rocks are orange because they are clothed in red-orange fuzz formed by the symbiotic relationship between lichen and fungi. The boulders are granite and their smooth rounded shapes are easy to scramble over. There were orange rocks at almost every beach I visited. The shape and size of the boulders and the size of their crystals varied a lot but the colours remained fairly consistent.

Orange granit boulders next to blue water
Bakers Beach my first glimpse of the ubiquitous orange rocks of Tassie.

Cradle Mountain National Park

While there are no glaciers in Australia these days there is plenty of evidence of their existence in the Cradle Mountain National Park. This area is spectacular, with large outcrops of granite-like dolerite. The craggy, jagged peaks make excellent photographic subjects and the area is one of the busiest tourist destinations in Tasmania. There are lots of walks in the area from short strolls to the arduous 6 day Overland Track. If you are not up for this long walk there is a 13 km Cradle Mountain Summit Walk.

The solid geology of Cradle Mountain has been described by many! This snippet is from a detailed report by I R Jennings. I could not find a date for the actual publication but the date on a map says November 1958. If you’d like more detail it’s an easy read despite the length.

Simple… realy

Barn Bluff, although looking very much like a volcanic plug is the result of extensive weathering of the dolerite intrusions.

Geology Bonanza! Flinders Island

What a treat Flinders Island is! A feast of geology and all on a very small plate as it were. I spent four days on Flinders and I am so glad I did. There is a geotrail! Imagine me doing a merry little dance and clapping my hands when I saw the first sign! I really recommend having a look at the website before you visit. Also, see my previous post about my visit.

Choose from red lichen coated rocks, massive boulders in the middle of paddocks, a summit climb, pegmatites and more! There’s topaz for those who like to fossick, plenty of sandy beaches and shallow coastal lagoons. Sigh!

The thing that got me really excited were the pegmatites (really really big crystals) at Killecrankie on the northern end of the island. How big? BIG! For reference, I included an Australian 50 cent coin that has a diameter of 31 mm. Super big crystals of course mean super slow cooling of the molten lava below the surface.

Marakoopa and King Solomon Caves – Mole Creek

The Mole Creek Karst Conservation Area has hundreds of caves. Some are open to the general public and others are open only to experienced spelunkers. When you book they tell you to dress warmly and you should! The caves stay at a steady 9oC throughout the year. I did a tour of both Marakoopa and King Solomon Caves. Marakoopa has an underground creek and glow worms while King Solomon’s Cave has larger caverns. “Discovered” by Europeans in the mid-1800s it has been a popular tourist destination ever since. The cave tours are led by interesting guides. Due to COVID restrictions, the numbers were very low which, in my opinion, enhanced the experience. You’ll need a camera with an adjustable ISO because flash photography is not permitted.

Alum Cliffs

Always on the look out for a good walk, long or short – I stopped to check out Alum Cliffs. It’s included in Tasmania’s 60 best short walks. It is only a 1.6 km return walk. At the end of the wooded path you suddenly come out to a platform which is perched 200 m above the Mersey River below. Take care if you suffer from vertigo.

Tulampanga, the Aboriginal name for Alum Cliffs, remains ​a place of particular significance to Aborigines because of the ochre found nearby. Along the walk there are sculptures and pieces of outdoor furniture, some created by local Aboriginal artists. 

https://parks.tas.gov.au/things-to-do/60-great-short-walks/alum-cliffs
Alum Cliffs

The Nut – Stanley

The Nut, an ancient volcanic plug, dominates the town of Stanley. You can climb or drive to the top or if you’re a bit braver, ride the chair lift. Chair lifts freak me out a bit! Generally, I am not scared of heights per se, but chairs lifts… shiver…..There is a 2.4 km loop walk up the top which gives you great views of the town below.

Fossil Bluff – Wynyard

And finally fossils! Plenty of them too! Fossil Bluff is on the western side of Wynyard which is in north west Tasmania. So much of geology to see here! Layers of marine fossils, boulders and a rocky beach.

Bit of wind noise sorry…

Urban Nature Study – Part 1

Earlier this year I volunteered to take part in an Urban Nature Study for an Honours student at the University of Wollongong. The study involved two Zoom interviews and three urban walks. On these walks I was required to take notice and record my interactions with urban nature. This included what I could hear, see, smell, and feel. To help me remember what I observed I made notes on the voice recorder app.

During the walks I was encouraged to take photos of the things I saw. It was pretty much the perfect sort of study for me! To top it off it we were still under some COVID restrictions so it was not as if I was doing anything else.

The student has submitted her work and I have permission to publish my contributions. I am not sure what her ‘findings’ were. Here is the first of my 3 walks. I have changed some of the street names.

Urban Nature Diary Day 1 – 13th June 2020

Saturday Beach Walk

My walk today was one of the two routes I take frequently. I call this route my “beach walk”.  The other is my “neighbourhood walk”. I sometimes run these routes rather than walk.  Today, I ran part of the way and walked part of the way as I was stopping to take photos. All up it took me about 1 hour 20 minutes.

This route takes me along Crown Street, past the hospital and railway station into the CBD, I then walk down to Smith Street and head to the beach from here. I walk past Levendi’s (a cafe), along the harbour, past the lighthouses and then past WIN Stadium. When I have the time (as on weekends) I extend the route and walk along the beach to the end of the golf course cut back up Swan Street under the railway bridge, up Gladstone Street, X Ave, Y Street, and then finally back onto Z Street and home. This is a little over 8 km. If I’m in a hurry, I cut back up to the WEC (Wollongong Entertainment Centre) and head back home through the Mall. If I’m running, I can do it in 50 minutes.

And we’re off…

This morning I left home at around 7:30 AM. There was a partial cloud cover. It was fine and crisp. It had been raining overnight so there were puddles and wet leaves on the ground

My phone said it was 12.7oC and dead calm.  I had dressed in long tights and a long sleeve lycra hoodie, joggers and socks. I normally listen to music or podcasts while I walk. Today it was a podcast.

The ground was wet, and the leaves made it slippery, so I picked my way out my driveway. The large liquid amber at the corner of my driveway drops so many leaves and I have slipped there before so I am always cautious.

The creepy tree

Just before you get to the hospital there is a huge Morton Bay Fig in a tiny park. There is very little room left in the park for anything but the tree. (Image 1) I really like this tree and have wondered how old it is and what it must have been like before it was hemmed in by the road and houses. It would make a good climbing tree as the branches hang down low to the ground. However, it would be near impossible to climb as the limbs are very broad and smooth. The buttress roots spread out for at least 5 metres in all directions.  I call it the “creepy tree” because it does not matter what time of day it is, the massive tree is always casting a shadow on the park. It smells dank and composty.

Image 1 – The Creepy Tree

Noisy traffic in the shopping precinct

The noise of the traffic makes it hard for me to hear any birds, but I did notice some dead or close to dead earthworms who had boldly ventured onto the pavement when it was raining and had now become trapped on the drying pavement. A bit of styrofoam captures my attention and I get annoyed and feel that the hi-fi store (likely source of the foam), should be held to account for the amount of foam that blows out of their bins and ends up as pollution on the street near their shop.

This part of the route is in my opinion, nothing but “urban”. It is paved and built up. There are few gardens as most of the premises are commercial. In the CBD itself, the council is attempting to green things up. (Images 2 – 4) 

It’s sad to see that their bright little street flower boxes are the target of vandals (Image 5)  If there are council workers watering the plants or replanting what has been ripped out, I’ll thank them for their work so hopefully they don’t get too downhearted that not everyone appreciates the little bit of colour the boxes provide. I notice the raindrops sticking to the leaves of plants. (Image 6)

Wollongong Harbour

Once I get to the harbour, I join the many others who are enjoying a walk or a run on this nice morning. The clouds are making a dramatic backdrop to the little lighthouse and Belmore Basin. Some pelicans are preening, and people are out in kayaks paddling on the smooth water. (Image 7)

Image 7 – Belmore Basin

There is a reasonable swell and some surfers are clustered at the end of City Beach. The water must be colder now as most are wearing wet suits.  (images 8 and 9)

It’s warming up and I am regretting that I didn’t wear a T-shirt and jacket rather than the hoodie which I can’t take off. 

Image 10 – Dead Calm

On the Beach

It’s dead calm.  (Image10) the air is clear and fresh, but I lament that it is not as clear as it was a few weeks ago when we were deep in COVID lockdown and the sky had a fresh luminous blue with no pollution hanging about in a brown haze.

Image 11

Once I get to WIN stadium and the footy field/golf course junction I head down to the beach. I take a lot of energy from the ocean and enjoy seeing it every day. For me, it’s peaceful and rugged and energising all at the same time. It’s mid tide so there is some compacted sand to make the walk easier. I have to dodge a few incoming waves to prevent getting my shoes wet but this adds to the fun. The sand shows evidence of last night’s rain with the little pock marks dimpling the sand. (image 11)

There are a few shells. (image 12) Last time I was on the beach there were lots of rocks and pebbles at the wave line and I notice that this time there are very few rocks. I wonder if they were carried away by last week’s big surf or if I was at a different part of the beach. Up ahead I see the little pebble “garden” I was looking for and figure that they do probably get moved as a result of the tide. (image 14.)

Image 13 – Roof tile?

Not a rock

I take especial interest in an unusual green “rock” (Image 13). I pick it up and turn it over in my hands. I decide that it’s not a rock after all and probably a piece of roof tile that has been washed down a creek. I’m on the lookout for sea-glass[1] as I collect interesting bits of that.

This is an off-leash beach but there are few dogs. A couple of gulls fly past skimming close to the sand. The air smells salty but since there is no wind to whip the sea spray into my face, I don’t taste it.

As I re-join the road and the buildings, I can hear some rainbow lorikeets squawking and fluttering in a large flowering gum near the dog training park on Swan St. There are some magpies or crows cawing as they fly overhead. I pass a garden which has some nice succulents spilling over the fence and I break off a small piece to bring home and plant in my own garden.

The home stretch

I am about two kilometres from home and I am now very much regretting the choice of outfit! The sun is rising higher and I am getting hotter! It’s a balance between going faster to get home quicker and overheating! On Gladstone Ave there are a few private gardens with some lovely old roses, but today most only have a few straggly petals left. There is also a house with a reasonable size quince tree. They don’t pick the quince and they fall on the ground every year. Each year I say to myself, “next year I am going to knock on their door and ask if I can have them before they go rotten!”

The large date palms on X street, always make me think of the cover of Hotel California (an album by the Eagles).

(I included that detail because the person doing the interview was very young and possibly not a 1970’s music fan!)

I cut across the little park on the corner of X Street and my joggers get wet from the grass.  The Bird of Paradise flowers catch my eye and a few spiders’ webs in the neighbour’s garden are glistening with rain.

I am home and it’s time for a cup of tea!


[1] Glass that gets washed up onto the beach and has been made smooth and translucent by the action of the sand and waves.


A Win-Win!

I’m a bit of a research study enthusiast and this study combined a few things I like to do, walk, take photos and write! In addition to that I was helping someone out so it contributed to my happiness! Doing good for others boosts your mood! As I said I have not seen the student’s finished work or even really understand the purpose of her study. However, having to stop and think about how I interacted and experienced nature in my urban setting was interesting and made me feel a real sense of connectedness.

Apart from this study I am also participating in a two long term health studies. One called the 45 and up study which has a long questionnaire every 5 years; and another 3 year study on dementia and lifestyle which has frequent questionnaires which alternate between eating and exercising habits. Once each year there is a comprehensive set of cognitive and memory tests.

I have also just done a five week stint being a “patient” for a trainee medical professional to assist them with their tele-health skills.

Being a writing frugalist, I wasn’t going to “waste” an extended piece of my own writing without including it here! It was a win-win! She got some observations for her research: I got a blog post! (Maybe 2 more if I publish the others!)