Short fiction: Bobby and Dotty

It seems I am very good a starting short fiction but I am not so good at finishing it. That must be why I love the Furious Fiction competition so much. With a short timeline and a 500 word limit it’s very good for someone like me! In the story arena, I’m a sprinter not a marathon runner.

Here is another Chapter 1 of what was originally going to be a longish short story. I remember when I started it in 2018(?) I had quite a complicated multi-pronged story arc in mind which I’ll elaborate on at the end of this post. I don’t want to drop any spoilers here! While Bobby and Dotty are purely fictional characters, their names are a hat-tilt towards my Mum and Dad (Bob and Dorothy.)

I see it as a screen play rather than a piece of prose. I can hear Bobby and Dotty talking in my head as I write.


Chapter 1:

Thwack! Bobbie slapped Dotty’s leg hard.   

“Got him!” he said as he flicked the flattened, blood-filled mozzie off his grubby palm and grinned widely. 

“OWWWW!” Dotty winced “Got her! You dummy! They’re girls, the ones that bite.” 

His grin collapsed. For goodness’ sake couldn’t he do something nice for her just once without it turning into a competition? Just once?  

“Come on, Dotty. It’s gunna be dark soon. We better get back before we get carried away by the little buggers.”  

They gathered up their things and Bobby threw his satchel under the plank seat as Dorothy pushed the dinghy into the still water. 

“I’ll row” Bobby said.  

“No, I will. You’re too slow” 

Bobby poked his tongue out and turned away. He was getting angry. Just because she was three months older and already eleven, didn’t make her the boss. He was faster than her anyway! 

Bobby plopped himself down and sat in silence as Dotty pulled the oars through the water steadily even though they were running against the tide. The muscles in her skinny arms, tense. Each time she leaned forward to dip the oars back in the water, he could see down her shirt; her singlet hiding soft puffy lumps.  He looked away. He was pretty sure she didn’t have those lumps at the beginning of summer.  

Bobby trailed his hand in the water and thought she had better hurry up otherwise his mum was going to throw his dinner to the dog. That was the rule in his house. If you weren’t home by dinner, sitting at the table, washed up and ready; you went hungry. Even Dad! He was pretty sure at this rate; he was going to be hungry.  

Dotty’s mum on the other hand, probably didn’t even have dinner started yet. She would be too busy writing or painting or basket weaving or some other bloody thing. She was very sophisticated. She was an art-teest. She drank I-tie wine. Bobby’s Dad called it plonk.  

‘Sheilas shouldn’t be drinking, full stop’ he’d say.  

But Mrs Garland drank lots. She wobbled around the house on pointy-toed high heeled shoes with a glass of red plonk in one hand and a lipstick rimmed smoke in the other. She said it helped her capture her muse. Bobby wasn’t sure what a muse would look like once she caught it, but she certainly seemed pretty keen to grab it.  

Bobby liked Mrs Garland, but Dotty didn’t seem to. She said his Mum was the best. That:  he couldn’t understand. His Mum was so strict. So many rules! You could do whatever you liked at Dotty’s. There was no bedtime, no homework time, no chores.  It was perfect!

Mrs Garland’s unfinished paintings, piles of newspaper and lumps of stiff clay wrapped up in once-damp hessian covered every surface. Only Dotty’s bedroom rose above the chaos. She said she liked to keep things neat because it was less confusing.

Clunk, the dinghy hit the bank and Bobby fell off the seat.

“Wake up dreamer!” she said as she flicked an oar-full of water at him. Without answering, he glowered at her and picked up his satchel. A crunchy tinkling sound rang out a warning from within.  

“Oh no Dotty! The thermos! It’s broken. Mum will kill me!”  

“Oh shit!”  she said.

Bobby’s Dad also said girls shouldn’t swear, but Dotty and her Mum both did. All. The. Time. 

Bobby removed the blanket-wrapped thermos from his satchel, and while intact on the outside, the inner glass canister was rattling inside the tartan metal tube. Dotty looked into Bobby’s wide, frightened eyes.  

“Don’t worry, Bobby. Mum has one exactly the same. She won’t miss it. We’ll duck into my place first and grab it. Your mum will never know.” 

By the time they had pulled off the switcheroo, it was nearly dark, well past 6:30 and sure enough as he went up the verandah steps and in through the back door, Rexy was wolfing into lamb chops, thick gravy and potato. Rexy didn’t seem to care they were covered in dust.  

“Yep,” Bobby thought as he looked down from the railing “I’m gunna be hungry.”  

“Where have you been till this late Robert?” 

“Across at the island. Looking for rocks.” 

“You and your rocks, Robert. You wasted a perfectly good tea. That dog will get fatter as you get skinnier.” 

“Yes Mum. Sorry Mum.”  

“Off to bed with you Robert. You need to learn how to tell the time and not be late for tea. I won’t waste my time cooking for the ungrateful. Say goodnight to your father.”

As Bobby walked into the lounge room, his dad Terry looked up from his newspaper. They both rolled their eyes towards the kitchen in a mutual display of mutiny.  

“Clare, give the kid some dinner, it’s the holidays for Pete’s sake” he said winking at Bobby 

“Terry, rules are rules!” came her voice above the clatter and bang of pots being washed. “I am not a short order cook you know.”  

“Not much of a bloody cook at all!” Terry whispered to Bobby as he passed him a buttered white bread sandwich from his pocket. They giggled. 

“What did you say Terence?” 

“Nothing, dear – just telling Bobby to be on time next time.”  

Bobby closed the bedroom door and grabbed his pyjamas from under the crisp white pillow. The smell of Sunlight Soap wafting up from its stiff folds. He loved Monday nights. Tonight, the bed linen would be sleek, cold, and fresh from the clothesline like it was every Monday. As he slipped off his shorts and undies, he heard a quiet tap on the window. Bobby pulled up the blind, 

“Ewwww, put some clothes on; will ya! I don’t want to see your willy!” Dotty whispered from the dark.  

His willy didn’t used to bother Dorothy. They had spent lots of time splashing naked and muddy in the Clarence in summers’ past, why the fuss now? 

“I thought your tea might have gone to the dog. Here. Mum actually cooked tonight.” She passed a bowl through the window.  

Bobby grimaced and Dotty laughed “It’s not that bad.” 

“What is it? It smells like vomit.” 

“That’s the cheese. It’s spaghetti bolognaise with parmesan cheese on top” 

Bobby sniffed at it again. Mrs Garland didn’t cook often but when she did, she cooked weird wog food. Tonight, wog food was better than no food! He sucked up the strands of spaghetti and the sauce splattered over his checks. It was good; actually. Better than chops. Well maybe not better but different. Better than dusty chops that the dog had mauled anyway. 

“Is your dad coming home soon?” Bobby asked between slurps.  

Dotty climbed in through the window and sat on the sill. She swung her feet slowly. “He must be. The house was tidy when I went in, and a big pot of spaghetti sauce was on the stove. I guess he’ll be here tomorrow or maybe the next day.”  Her voiced trailed off and she jumped down to sit on the floor. She chewed the end of her plait, squeezing the elastic band between her teeth. Her gaze went nowhere.

Dotty’s family was so exciting compared to the boring rule laden relations he suffered. Terry worked on the river punt.  Every day was the same. Up at five thirty, porridge, tea, walk to the punt. Some days were busy, and some days were slow, but he always got home before six. A minute after six, and Terry’s dinner would end up in the dirt, with Rexy smiling. Fridays were different. Terry was allowed to go the Grafton Pub on Fridays. Two beers and then home with a newspaper parcel of fish and chips under his arm.  

Dotty’s dad was in the Merchant Navy. Bobby was not really sure what that meant either, but Hamilton Garland only came home for a couple of weeks each year; one week, every six months. Dotty always got a bit nervous then. This man was a poorly used punctuation mark in her life. Like an unwelcome interrobang; for Dotty he signalled chaos.  

Mrs Garland tried really hard not to drink in the days leading up to Hamilton’s arrival. She spruced herself and the house up. She cooked. She packed away the half-finished art. She wore nice clothes and even Bobby could tell she smelt nice. Hamilton was posh. He spoke with a rich refined English accent. He told Dotty to go bathe rather than have a barf. 

He would bring gifts. Painted, waxed parasols form Korea; silk kimonos from Japan. Once, a leopard’s skin from deepest, darkest Africa! Dotty didn’t appreciate any of these gifts. They would end up in the bin the day after Hamilton left. Bobby thought she was ungrateful, he never got presents except at Christmas or on his birthday.  He’d love a leopard skin like that! Its allure was not diminished even after Dotty pointed out that the Made in China sticker buried in the fake fur.  

On the nights Hamilton was home, Bobby would lean on the windowsill, with his light off, and watch as Dotty’s folks would drink wine and sing. Hamilton would brush the dust off the guitar that had sat in the corner since last time and Mrs Garland would sing like an angel and Dotty would dance.  If Dotty saw him spying, she would pull the blinds, cutting him off from their fun.  

The paling fence that divided their yards, divided their lives into very different worlds.

Bobby was embarrassed by Dotty’s lack of interest in her Dad. She never said she wished he didn’t come, but Bobby could tell she didn’t like it when he was there. Hamilton would arrive on Tuesday but by Friday, Dotty would be tapping on Bobby’s window. 

“Can I sleep here?”  she’d ask her dark eyes filled with even darker fear.

Bobby would sneak her in through the window even though he knew his mum kill him. Sometimes Dotty would cry. Silent tears fell down her screwed-up face and she would hold her belly. She wouldn’t tell him why and Bobby figured that Dotty got sick from the all the spaghetti sauce.


Developing the story arc

I am hoping I left enough clues for you to pick up that the story is set in Australia, in the early 1960s. In particular it is set in Grafton on the north coast of NSW. The “Clarence” is the Clarence River, one of the largest rivers in Australia. It floods the surrounding areas frequently. Bobby and Dotty are on summer holidays. There are two islands (Susan and Elizabeth Island) in the middle of a bend near the main part of town.

The multi-pronged story arc I eluded to above includes some or all of the following:

  • Hamilton Garland is a predatory child abuser.
  • The town floods and after the water recedes Bobby and Dotty find human remains on their island.
  • They don’t tell anyone about the bones.
  • Dotty tells Bobby about her dad and he tells his dad.
  • Terry kills Hamilton because that’s not the way you treat sheilas and kids.
  • He dumps the body on the island and the kids tell him about the other remains.
  • They don’t tell anyone and because Hamilton is only in town one week every six months no-one suspects foul play and no-one really misses the bastard anyway!
  • Fast forward 30 years to the 1992 Grafton High School 80 year anniversary celebration where Dotty and Bobby met up after not seeing each other for 20 years. They are now 30 something
  • They reminisce about what happened when they were kids and decide to find out if the two sets of bones are still there.
  • Mrs Garland is still alive but coughing up her lungs with advanced lung cancer. She is still looking for her muse.
  • Terry is dead after dying relatively young from a heart attack.
  • Clare is hale and hearty and has become an adventurous 60 year old.
  • Both Bobby and Dotty are in miserable marriages living the 1990’s dream with big mortgages with high interest rates.
  • There is a romantic liaison. (obviously!!)
  • They try to find out who the first set of bones belong to.
  • They decide to let sleeping dogs lie after much soul searching.
  • The end.

Maybe one day I’ll finish it! I initially wanted to make the original bones indigenous and the island a sacred burial ground for the Bundjalung First Nations people. The idea was to have a clash of cultures. But that is not my story to tell and I don’t feel it is right for me to appropriate it.

Freedom day In Greater Sydney

Freedom Day? October 11th 2021.

Today has been unofficially labelled as “Freedom Day” for people in NSW and especially those of us in Greater Sydney. We have been in lockdown since June 16. We started with Lockdown Lite followed by full-strength lockdown since 28th June. Today, the Monday after the State reached 70% fully vaxxed, we are getting out! But not completely. 

The shops will be open, not just the essential ones. Cafes and restaurants will be open under various density rules that limit the number of people who may enter. We can have up to ten people  visit our homes. We can ditch the masks when we are outside but still need them indoors. The “roadmap” is long and precise. 

Everything you need to know!

Tourist in your own town.

We can travel beyond our LGA but we can not leave Greater Sydney and conversely, regional people can not travel to Greater Sydney. We have to wait till 80% vaxxed for that. There’s no firm date for the 80% day, but it will be some time in early November. By December 1 2021, everyone including those confined to the “leper colonies” of the unvaxxed, will be allowed to do basically anything with no density or occupancy limits. I guess this means for the next little while we will all be tourists in our own town or city.

Finding little delights while out COVID-walking

Nervous Nellys?

I have to admit I am a little anxious about going back out into the big wide world, and I know that there are plenty of other nervous Nellys like me. Will people go crazy and forget to keep their distance? Will there be a spike in numbers? (The answer to that is yes, of course there will be!) Will the lockdown we have just endured be for nought? I hope not. 

It doesn’t help that our Premier, Gladys quit last week and the new fellow seems like a backward sort of person who supported Trump! He made some significant changes to the roadmap including bringing schools back a week early while still demanding all teachers are vaxxed before they can return. Many teachers have bookings but can’t get the jab in time, but they won’t be allowed to come to school. Just who will take their classes?

Keeping a low profile

I have decided I’m going to continue to keep a low profile until we reach the 80% target. I am fully vaxxed, but that does not mean I am not capable of being a transmitter. Some of my work colleagues are very vulnerable and I don’t want to put them at risk.

Besides that, I quite liked some of the aspects of lockdown. Not ”having” to go out. Saving truckloads of money. Enjoying walks after dinner. Picnics. Outdoor crafternoons with a singles buddy. I am hoping these habits stay after today. The thought of going back to a noisy pub or restaurant as the preferred entertainment option does not fill me with joy. At least lockdown gave me a good excuse to pamper my introverted side.

More COVID-walking!

I am rather glad that the craft stores will be open though! 🙂 

Snapshots of Wollongong – Ken Ausburn Track

This post returns to the Snapshots of Wollongong Series. I haven’t done one for quite awhile! With lockdown still keeping us close to home in the Greater Sydney region, I went looking for some novel walks. I came across a short track that links to the Mt Keira Ring Track which I have featured in a previous Snapshot post.

The Ken Ausburn Track starts at the northern end of Northfeilds Ave, just near the big roundabout and the University of Wollongong. The track, although managed by the NSW National Parks and Wildlife, is on land owned by the University and BHP. It is named after Kenneth Ausburn, who was the first Head of Physics at the Uni and a keen bushwalker.

Just a short stroll

The Ken Ausburn Track is very short, only about 1 .5 km but it is fairly steep. There are several flights of wooden steps and boardwalks and other areas with steps made with treated logs. At the end of the trail you can turn right towards Mt Pleasant (a further ~0.5 km) or left to get to the Ring Track. This short section of about 600 m is well used by mountain bike riders so make sure you listen out for them. The track is narrow and it would be a close squeeze if walkers and riders ended up in the same section. The track is mostly bare compacted dirt. It would be a terror in the wet, so I’d recommend avoiding it on a rainy day.

Deer Deer!

You’ll see plenty of deer poop on the grassy lower sections of the track. Feral deer are a big problem in the Illawarra and their numbers are increasing. I have written a post about this which you can find in my archives.

Feral deer are a significant issue in the Illawarra

Accessible by Public Transport

The University is on the free city bus route. You could get off at the main Uni bus area (see map below), walk up Northfields Ave for about 400 m and join the track. The trail head is easy to find although it looks a bit like someone’s back yard. You could use this track to access the Ring Track which is NOT serviced by public transport. If you did the Ken Ausburn Track plus the complete loop of the Ring Track it would be pleasant walk coming in at under 10 km. If you wanted a longer walk you could add in the Robertson Lookout (another 2.5km).

Architectural treats

In addition to the pleasant walk, there are two architectural treats along the way. Firstly, the Lawrence Hargrave Memorial and then the Kermira Brick Ventilation Shaft. The memorial is a modern stainless steel sculpture depicting a flying creature. It was crafted by Bert Flugelman in 1988. There is apparently a small replica in the grounds of the Uni itself. A friend told me that she watched the sculpture being airlifted in by an army helicopter when she was still in primary school. On the other hand, the ventilation shaft is constructed from red bricks and is rather elegant. It was erected in the 1890s. There are several interpretive signs on the route which point out plant species and the history of the track. It was originally a rail line for getting coal down the hill and then on to the harbour.

Best views

The best views are from the start of the track, specifically on the first flight of wooden stairs. You need to walk up a very steep grassed section first. From here you can see the city laid out in front of you and to the south, the Nan Tien Temple. As you get up higher there are too many trees blocking the view. (Darn nature!!) There is a section marked as a lookout a bit further up but it is very overgrown and you can’t see much.

Logisitcs.

As I said, you could catch the bus to the Uni. If you do drive be aware that the parking is limited and most is only for two hours (even on weekends). The section near the Uni colleges is not time limited but I think it would be hard to come by a spare space in peak periods and during Uni session times. There are publicly accessible toilets at the Uni. If you choose to add on the Ring Track, there is a toilet at Byarong Park. There is a coffee shop at the Mt Keira Summit but check the opening hours as it is not very reliable, especially in COVID times. Byarong Park has several picnic tables and is a great place to stop. Take full advantage of being outdoors and carry a packed lunch.

Of course, take enough water. Don’t be lulled into thinking it’s only a short walk and you won’t need water. It is very steep in sections and will get you puffing. If you add on the Ring Track there is no where to fill up your water bottle.

Google it!